The Making of a DevOps Boot Camp: Four Questions for Course Author Justin Poole

The DevOps movement is alive and well, but as an industry, it’s fair to say we might not all be on the same page. nTier Training’s latest DevOps boot camp is designed to fill existing knowledge gaps and equip teams to take on their DevOps migration with a common vernacular.

Before you check out the outline in our course catalog, read what course co-writer Justin Poole had to say about the boot camp in this brief Q&A.

1. What’s the big deal about DevOps?

DevOps exploded in 2017, which is no surprise. It supports the industry’s need for more speed and agility, and those benefits were obviously our focal point when writing this course.After sending a development team through the DevOps boot camp, companies can expect to see a significant decrease in their code’s cost of ownership. They will also see an increase in the speed of development, and a lot of the annoyances slowing developer’s down on a daily basis will be eliminated. It’s a win-win.

2. Anything special about this boot camp’s approach to DevOps?

Our DevOps boot camp incorporates good object-oriented programming (OOP) practices, such as OOP design patterns, to promote efficiency in the DevOps lifecycle. It goes beyond just teaching a set of tools; we want to ensure the team has a proper foundation empowering them to write maintainable and scalable code that can be effortlessly incorporated with the various DevOps tools.This boot camp is also customizable, which is helpful because every team does DevOps differently and strategies vary by organizational size.

3. What kind of audience were you writing for when creating this course?

This boot camp was built for developers, and since you don’t implement DevOps alone, a full development team would ideally take the course together and immediately see improvements in the way they write, test and integrate code.

4. What topics stand out in this boot camp for you?

My favorite sections are Cucumber and Selenium, which both introduce a new or different way to test applications. Cucumber aims to bridge the gap between technical/non-technical personnel, while Selenium tests web applications… and is just fun to use. A lot of the development teams we work with don’t write a lot of tests or don’t write adequate tests, so this is an area where changes can be implemented immediately with huge potential gains in productivity. It’s neat to be a part of that positive change.